STEM Research: What the Pictures Tell Us

By John Nicholson, Shane T. Warren, Bonnie Oppenheimer, Mark Goodman, James Codling, Thomas Robinson and Jee Young Chung.

Published by The International Journal of Science in Society

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

In our image study, we showed participants images of women associated with a job title. In one survey, each image had a STEM job title; and in a second survey, each image had a non-STEM job title. Our results indicate that college students in America maintain cultural stereotypes related to STEM careers, which we think helps explain why Caucasian and Asian males continue to dominate STEM fields, even as women are making significant career gains in other areas. We sought to obtain further insight into these stereotypical views by conducting a Draw-the-Scientist study among college students on STEM career paths and students in communication. Pre-service and in-service teachers also participated. Our presentation will feature the images drawn by the participants and a sampling of the images used in our image study.

Keywords: STEM, Draw-the-Scientist, Stereotypes

The International Journal of Science in Society, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp.1-14. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 509.542KB).

Dr. John Nicholson

Assitant Professor of Communication, Department of Communication, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, USA

John Nicholson graduated from the University of Iowa (Ph.D., 1998) and has participated in multiple interdisciplinary projects including the current STEM research presented here. His other research areas include sibling research and family nickname research.

Shane T. Warren

College of Education, Mississippi State University, USA

Dr. Bonnie Oppenheimer

Professor of Mathematics, Department of Sciences and Mathematics, Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, Mississippi, USA

Dr. Oppenheimer is a professor of mathematics at Mississippi University for Women. She has long been interested in why women do not choose the STEM fields. She helped form our research group, and has led the group's efforts to pursue STEM research questions.

Dr. Mark Goodman

Professor, Department of Communication, Mississippi State University, MS, USA

Dr. James Codling

instructor, College of Education, Mississippi State University, MS, USA

Thomas Robinson

Research Assistant, Social Science Research Center, Mississippi State University, MS, USA

Dr. Jee Young Chung

Assistant Professor, Department of Communication, Southern Utah University, Cedar City, UT, USA